Spring has sprung!

Spring has sprung and we are all freezing covered in snow!

The year has been a busy one so fay with plenty to discuss but one point in particular keeps cropping up and that is castration.

Castration for medical reasons and to prevent breeding I understand but castration as a treatment for behavioural problems is a whole different subject and one that is sometimes too readily recommended by vets as a solution.

I work with more castrated dogs than entire ones which I believe is a very interesting point.

I understand if a dog is a challenge and a problem, owners want to resolve the issue quickly yet owners don't often consider the very behavioural problems are often of their own creation yet this aspect of the behavioural problem is often not recognised, understood or dealt with yet it can have the most effective results.

If your dog has a behavioural problem towards the people with whom he lives, the behaviour is likely to be a learned one which can often be retrained if the owners are prepared to change.

Rescue dogs often carry the same behaviours into their new home that caused them to be rehomed in the first place because the new owners behave in the same way as the previous owners so the dogs behaviour remains unchanged.

The mirror can be the hardest place to look for the reason for a behaviour but it can be the easiest part to address given the right guidance.

Your dog is unlikely to have been born frustrated, that tends to be a learned behaviour so if your dog bites you, even in play, ask yourself a question. Why is my dog biting me, am I doing something that he finds frustrating?

Looking at the world from your dogs point of view is very enlightening and can be very productive in helping change the behaviours os the most common cause of dog behaviour problems, the owners.

The cure does not always lie with someone else removing parts of your dog, it can very often be a lot closer than that. If you would like help with your dog, please get in touch.